Month: December 2017

D&D Classing it Up: Paladin

D&D Classing it Up: Paladin

We’re getting back into the lawful good style of D&D. My number one piece of advice is, don’t play lawful stupid. That’s no fun for you, and it just makes the game itself less fun for everyone else. Unless you play it so far over […]

Book ’em, Nerd-O: Ready Player One

Book ’em, Nerd-O: Ready Player One

During Peder’s and my trip to AcadeCon last month, we spent a lot of time in the car, driving through the largely uninspiring landscape that is the Midwest. And while we filled some of that time with talking, we filled a lot of it by […]

D&D Classing It Up: Monk

D&D Classing It Up: Monk

Continuing on with this series, we’re looking at the Monk. The Monk is the martial arts expert. They are focused on hand-to-hand combat, and on manipulating people and objects to deal maximum damage. However, they don’t look to bring in bigger or stronger weapons but instead strive to be faster and more nimble, and to avoid punches instead of absorbing them with armor. A Monk is the kung-fu master of the D&D world.

Image Source: Wizards

Mechanically, it comes down to their ability to deal extra damage by using punches as extra attacks or being able to jump in and out of combat quickly using their ki abilities. Monks can often do minor magic with their ki points, but they aren’t generally considered a magic-focused class, and they are going to be spending most of their time in the fray. People often play them as ninja characters, like Nimrose was in Dungeons & Flagons. Her main weapons were shuriken and nunchaku. However, there are plenty more ways to play a monk, and with the different class paths a monk can choose from, they can look very different depending on how you want to play them. How a monk uses and manipulates ki is really how you determine what type of monk you are and where you fit into a monastic tradition. While a monk following the Way of the Shadow is a ninja-/assassin-style character, a monk following the Way of Tranquility gets features that allow them to use ki, but not for violence.

The monk is also interesting because so many backgrounds can work with it. We’ll look at some possibilities in my backstory ideas:


From a young age, you’ve been trained to be an assassin. You don’t know who your parents were, though you assume they are dead because you ended up living with a relative who hated you. Eventually, you ran away and decided that you could make it on your own on the streets. Things weren’t as easy as you hoped on the street, and one cold night, you found your way to a monastery. They let you in and gave you a place to live. They saw in you the potential of someone who had learned to sneak around on the streets, and they started training you and brought you into the shadow organization that the monastery housed. The code of your monastery now leads you still as you take jobs and are asked to kill. The master of your monastery was killed recently, and you’ve taken it upon yourself to right the wrong and find out who killed him.

Tradition: Way of the Shadow

Background: Urchin


Image Source: D&D Beyond

As a scout for the army, you’ve seen killing for years. You’ve tried to avoid as much battle as you can, but that wasn’t possible. You don’t want to see death anymore, and you’ve taken it upon yourself to find a peaceful way of life. On the higher reaches of a mountain, you found a place where you could spend time with others who were like-minded, where you could try to find inner peace. A dragon has also found this mountain, and as one of the few of the monastery who has spent time in the world before, you feel it is your duty to help find those who can rid the world of the dragon. Maybe if you can help others, they will in turn help you. Hopefully they understand that you just want to help without hurting anyone.

Tradition: Way of Tranquility

Background: Soldier


As a youth, you joined a monastic order and loved your life in solitude. Training and self-discipline are things that meant the most to you. You hadn’t realized that there were those leading your order who sought to bring back an ancient deity. This deity had been locked away for a reason, and when you found out what was going on, you didn’t know what to do. You ran away, going to a city on the far side of the continent. You started drinking, and you weren’t sure what meaning you had in your life anymore. Now you believe that you were sent here to find those who can help stop your order from bringing back the deity — after you have another drink.

Tradition: Way of the Drunken Master

Background: Acolyte


Your parents sent you away at a young age to learn the arts of a monastic order. This is normal for your family; your father before you had gone here, and that is where he met your mother. That was how it had been for the generation before, as well. The grace and fluidity of the order helps train your mind and body for the life you were supposed to have ahead of you. Then you got the news that your parents had been arrested, accused falsely of having stolen the treasures from a town where their troupe was performing. You left, your training nearly complete, and are headed there to free them and prove their innocence.

Tradition: Any

Background: Entertainer


Have you had a chance to play a monk before? Did you lean into the Eastern traditions that are inherent in the class, or did you seek to play something different?


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D&D Classing it Up: Fighter

D&D Classing it Up: Fighter

Ready for a Holiday Fight, we come back with one more post, this time on playing a fighter. A fighter is often considered the most boring of classes but one that is really wide open. A fighter seems pretty bland because they are just a […]

THANK YOU!!!

THANK YOU!!!

Just wanted to put out a quick post to say thank you to everyone who has listened to Dungeons and Flagons. I just posted the finale for Season 1 where Finja, Nimrose, and Torin take on the Beholder. I hope that you’ve enjoyed the season. […]

Dungeons and Flagons Episode 84: The Beholder

Dungeons and Flagons Episode 84: The Beholder

Finja, Nimrose, and Torin finally face off against the Beholder. What will happen to them?

 

If you have questions for Nerdologists: Dungeons and Flagons emails them to nerdologists@gmail.com or find us on Facebook or Twitter! We’ll be doing a recap and Q&A every twenty-five episodes.


The World of Dungeons and Flagons!

The World of Dungeons and Flagons!


Our players are:

Ashley – Nimrose the Wood Elf Monk

Kristen (@Kefka73) – Finja the Human Paladin

Clint – Tate the Halfling Bard & Torin the Half-Orc Druid

The DM:

Peder (@TheScando)

 

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Share questions, ideas for articles, or comments with us!

Email us at nerdologists@gmail.com
Follow us on Twitter at @NerdologistCast
Message me directly on Twitter at @TheScando
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We are trying a new thing with Amazon Links. If you’re interested in what we talked about in our articles or used for the podcast, please consider making a purchase through our links. Purchases help support our website and offset our costs. Thanks!

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D&D Classing it up: Druid

D&D Classing it up: Druid

Getting back to a classier note, it’s time to class it up some more with Dungeons & Dragons. This time, we’re going to look at how you might want to play a druid. One thing I want to mention first about all of these classes […]

Dungeons and Flagons Episode 83: Best Laid Plans of Elves and Orcs

Dungeons and Flagons Episode 83: Best Laid Plans of Elves and Orcs

After a long delay we’re back leading up to the epic conclusion of Dungeons and Flagons Season 1 in Episode 84 (coming out next week). Facing off against several Yuanti and knowing a beholder is waiting for them our fearless adventuring group, Torin, Nimrose, and […]

TableTopTakes: Machi Koro Bright Lights Big City

TableTopTakes: Machi Koro Bright Lights Big City

I talked a tiny bit about this game in my AcadeCon review, but I wanted to mention it again and do a proper review on it.

Machi Koro is what is called a “tableau building” game. In this type of game, you are building up a group of cards/tiles/etc in front of you, almost as your own personal game board. With this board you gain resources to purchase more cards, until you either score enough points, or, like in Machi Koro, build the right combination of special buildings for your city.

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Machi Koro is a game that is more focused around the mechanics than any sort of theme. It really could be almost anything, but the theme of the game is that you’re building up a city. And when dice are rolled, you get money. For example, if you have a bakery (which is one of the starting cards) and you roll a 2 or a 3 on your turn, you get a coin from the bakery. You could look at it as taxes, or, if you want to think of it in a more fun way, that you’re playing as a business mogul (I guess) and your businesses are making money. The coins can then be used to buy more cards which, if you roll the right number on your turn, get you more coins. You’re looking to build special buildings that cost various amounts, and the first person to build all of their special buildings wins the game. It would be possible to just keep your base buildings and build up your money and buy stuff that way, but that wouldn’t be any fun, and you’d probably lose horribly. So you’re looking to make the most profitable town you can so you can eventually get something special like an amusement park or a city mall or a harbor into your city; cards like these give you special abilities, such as being able to roll two dice and taking the combined total so that you can get the rewards from some of your better cards that might need an 8 or 9 to be rolled.

Image Source: The Dork Den

This game is a lot like Splendor in many ways. Splendor has a tableau building mechanic as well, and that’s how you build up your system to get better cards that are worth more points. I think I like this game better, because it is more thematic (though it’s not very thematic). Also, with the rolling of dice, it allows you to have luck go your way sometimes. Maybe you don’t diversify your numbers, so you really need to have a five rolled, but when you do roll it, it’s amazing. Splendor is a little bit too static for me, and I think Machi Koro, while using a similar gaming style, makes it feel like more of a game where you’re waiting to see what you’ve rolled. It’s a bit of excitement that can be missing at times in Splendor.

Overall, I like the concept of this game, I like the mechanics of this game, and I like the weight of this game. After having playing RPGs all weekend at AcadeCon, this one was a nice digestif to wrap up with. Only one person I played it with knew the game, and they got it up and running fast for the rest of us. Turns go quickly, and you can collect coins sometimes on other peoples turns, so everyone was involved throughout. I think it would be a good game to wrap up a board game night with, or even to start off a board game night before going to something heavier. This is an aperitif or digestif of a game, which is something that is hard to come by.

Overall Grade: B+

Gamer Grade: C+

Casual Grade: A

Have you played Machi Koro Bright Lights Big City or the original Machi Koro? If so, what did you think of it? Is it better than Splendor?


Share questions, ideas for articles, or comments with us!

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