TelevisionTalks: Assassination Classroom

Back with some Anime fun, this time it’s the crazy anime Assassination Classroom. This is a weird one that I just randomly found on my own, and I’m very glad that I did. For a title like it has, it’s actually way less violent and considerably  more touching than you’d expect for an anime named Assassination Classroom.

Image Source: Crunchyroll

The story is that the moon has been blown up and the crazy octopus like creature that caused it is threatening to blow up to the Earth in March. That means that he has time to teach a class of delinquent junior high kids because of a promise that he made. In turn, the government is using those kids to try and kill Korosensei, which is what they’ve named their teacher. The series follows their attempts to kill him, their attempts to improve their stock in the school, and mainly what they learn from his teaching and addressing issues that they have as students. The assassination aspect of the show quickly takes a back seat to the lessons learned.

Assassination Classroom, because of the lessons learned, is a very heartfelt anime. While it is more certainly goofy with an octopus teacher Korosensei and the assassination attempts, you quickly realize that the focus is on the students and the lessons that they learn through assassination attempts but also through the teaching and caring nature of Korosensei. There’s a ton of depth behind a lot of the episodes and the characters themselves. It builds well over time and it’s fun to see relationships grow with Kororsensei and the students and just the growth in the students themselves. The sub plots in the show are often very goofy, but there is something going on with The E Class (lowest lettered class for their grade) and the rest of the school that is often times compelling and unique with how it talks about education.

I honestly can’t say a ton more about it without giving away some of the story, but it goes in a way that you’d expect, especially through the first season. That isn’t a bad thing with this anime. There are parts of the basic story that are always going to go against standard tropes. It makes the story feel interesting, and the fact that an anime that sounds like it should be very violent and focused on that uses it as a backdrop is very nice. It’s also a fairly clean anime in terms of fan service and gore for that matter. It is also an anime that feels like it should have those things which helps subvert the expected tropes for it. The story has some violence to it and that’s always an aspect to it, however, it’s more funny, dramatic, and highly heartfelt. I think that’s some of the issue that other people who have watched it have had with it. They haven’t expected that from Assassination Classroom, and as I’ve said before, it goes against the expectations.

Image Source: Anime Planet

In the end, this an anime that I would highly recommend. As I watched more if it, the more I liked it. I thought there were a few rough sections in the second season, but everything that was rough about it came back and was properly landed as a good story element. Some of that is because some very absurd things happen, and some of it is because they tie in items that you don’t expect together. For me the one part that I didn’t love was the third act, though they did a better job than a lot of third acts that I’ve seen. Some of it was just that I hoped a few things would happen that didn’t happen. None of it was weak, it just felt like there was a little bit unneeded. I felt like a lot of it could easily be assumed from how things were left at the end of the previous episode and it would have carried more weight without the third act. It isn’t Harry Potter epilogue level of bad though (I can write about that and third acts later).

Have you seen this anime? What did you think of it?


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