Tag: Elder Signs

Top 5: Action Point Games

Top 5: Action Point Games

Final top 5 list, I think that I could maybe come up with some more lists, but I might do eventual lists of games that play best or up to two through six or seven to give ideas for games like that. As I know […]

Top 5: Cooperative Games

Top 5: Cooperative Games

One of the last two board game top 5’s I’m going to do. Cooperative games are a ton of fun, sure you might like to beat up on another person in a game, but what works well with cooperative games is the game is going […]

Board Game Battles: Arkham Horror vs Arkham Horror vs Elder Signs vs Mansions of Madness

Board Game Battles: Arkham Horror vs Arkham Horror vs Elder Signs vs Mansions of Madness

Yes, this is a four way showdown between the heavy hitters that I’ve played of the Lovecraftian world. Now, there are lot more Lovecraftian/elder god games out there, including Eldritch Horror that could have joined the list. In fact Eldritch Horror would have made a lot of sense as it is also a Fantasy Flight Games game. However, I haven’t played that one yet, so let’s meet the contenders.

Image Source: Token Female Gamer

Arkham Horror

This is the first of the two Arkham Horror entries, and this one is set aside for the massive board game. Akrham Horror is a massive game where you take on the roll of investigators trying to stop a great old one from bringing madness or at least doom upon the earth. Also, let’s just get this out of the way, that’s the description for all of these games to some extent. This is the epic big game as you work your way around the city of Arkham. You investigate, fight monsters, travel to other realms and close portals to those realms. The average Arkham Horror game goes on for a long time, too long for some, hence why Fantasy Flight made Eldritch Horror and other games to take it’s place. Now, I haven’t played this game with expansions, but the base game is a very long game by itself. It’s a pretty straight forward game as well but challenging. What I appreciated about it was that you could try and figure out things in different ways. One downside is that some characters kind of got locked into a cycle of madness that was very tough to get out of. Or at least that they didn’t get out of the sake of the game, so they were limited in what they could do.

Image Source: Fantasy Flight

Arkham Horror LCG

Alright, finally differentiated between the two Arkham Horrors. LCG stands for Living Card Game, and while Arkham Horror the board game is a beast with tons of pieces, the card game has fewer pieces and no game board. The game is a much smaller profile and plays in a shorter time. While the basic premise remains the same, the story of the card game takes place on a much smaller scale, and you are playing through cards, using abilities and investigating to solve smaller cases. And while the game has great old ones who are looming all around and are being summoned, it doesn’t feel like it’s about that. It’s more about busting up cults and fighting smaller monsters. The story is also more focused as you work through scenarios. There are the larger box versions of the game which have three scenarios, but there are also smaller ones that play with fewer cards. One nice thing is that they are always coming out with more story for this game, so if you love it, you can continue to play with it.

Image Source: Fantasy Flight Games

Elder Signs

Elder Signs, in my opinion, is the light weight version of Arkham Horror. The location in the base game is more focused as you are investigating in a museum, but a lot of it feels pretty similar. The mechanics for this game are also simpler as you are rolling dice to try and complete investigations and sometimes you also are going to have to deal with monsters that pop up in the museum. This isn’t the friendly night at the museum, but one where portals open up to other worlds. Most of the time with this game, you are playing the odds, figuring out who should go where based off of character abilities and who can roll which dice. This game while enjoyable doesn’t have the story that the other two have and feels a lot lighter. That isn’t always a bad thing, but as compared to the other two games, it is lighter on theme.

Mansions of Madness 2nd Edition

Wanted to call out that this is for second edition as I haven’t played the first edition. This game also has a smaller feel story wise as you are investigating particular places, versus going around town or the world as in other games. What is unique about this game is that it is app driven as well. You are getting clues from the app and that cuts down on one person having to run the game, or on looking up things for each scenario. As with most of these games, you can be sure that someone is trying to summon something horrible or has made a pact they shouldn’t have with an elder god, but it’s less about unleashing the end of the world, and more about unleashing terrible destruction (they’re pretty similar). This game has a lot of ambiance that goes with it as well. The app can play music to set the theme can help make the game, but even without that, the game is a lot of fun and you are playing through scenarios that are led by the app, so the game is steeped with theme. Mansions of Madness is also a larger board game, but set-up is pretty easy because of the app.

Image Source: Fantasy Flight

Verdict

I’ve already done some of the comparison and contrasting, and I think that this is more a one v one match-up in two different categories. There are the two more world ending games with Arkham Horror and Elder Signs that are about stopping an elder god from coming through. Between these two, Arkham Horror is the winner because it has more theme. I am actually now leaning towards getting rid of my copy of Elder Signs. I’ve had fun playing it, but the game is a little simplistic, and the rules aren’t the best written.

Then between the two more scenario driven games. Now, this is tough, because I really like both of them. Mansions of Madness has a balance between video game and board game that you’re starting to see more with games getting apps to partner with them. It also makes a game that could be a bit complicated a whole lot more simple. And when you play a scenario it is going to be different. Arkham Horror LCG, on the other hand ties story together really well and is pretty fast to set-up and tear down. I think I like Arkham Horror LCG better because of that aspect and because it plays solo really well. So for the amount of work that you have to put into a solo game of it, I believe you can solo Mansions of Madness as well, Arkham Horror gets the edge.

Now the final showdown, two quite different games, but they have a similar setting and theme being Lovecraftian. Which is better, Arkham Horror or Arkham Horror LCG. This is actually a lot easier, because of the bulk and time commitment of the Arkham Horror board game, it is easily the LCG. I’ve played Arkham Horror once, and while I want to more, it’s hard to get to the table. The Arkham Horror LCG I’ve had for a few months, and while I haven’t gotten through the full first scenario, I’ve played it with a number of pieces of it a couple of times and with different people. The game is just more balanced and cleaner play.

Overall, I think there’s a spot for each of these games. The lighter play in Elder Signs is going to fill a spot for a lot of people because it’s easier to get to the table and teach. Fantasy Flight does their Lovecraft right, and from what I know of Eldritch Horror is that it’s a solid less heavy, but still heavy, replacement for Arkham Horror.

Which is your favorite of these games? Is there one that you get to the table more often than others or one that now you want to try?


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Gaming in a Big Group – Part 2

Gaming in a Big Group – Part 2

I want to start this article talking about some of the pitfalls with bigger player count games. It’s one thing that party style games generally do pretty well, but can be issues with other games. The big pitfall is some of these games have too […]

Know Your Nerds: Peder’s Top 5 Board Games

Know Your Nerds: Peder’s Top 5 Board Games

So we’ve kind of done this before with Table Top Picks, our top 7 board games, but since then, I’ve certainly played more games, so my list might have changed. I also tried to avoid looking back at my list so I wasn’t basing it […]

Table Top Picks: Peder’s Top 7 Favorite Board Games

Table Top Picks: Peder’s Top 7 Favorite Board Games

This idea came from a Twitter friend, @Mundangerous, one of the hosts of the ENnie nominated podcast, Total Party Thrill. Since both The RPG Academy and Nerdologists have gone away from using the name Table Topics, which you can read about in the Five Tribes post, he suggested that we go with Table Top Picks. That doesn’t make great sense for a review series, but it was too good not to use. So the next two posts are going to be Kristen and my favorite board games.*

* For this article board games can mean card/dice games as well but not RPG’s.

Image Source: Fantasy Flight Games
Image Source: Fantasy Flight Games

7. Elder Signs

Why: Elder Signs has a theme that I really like. Lovecraft and his world of horror is very interesting. It takes some ideas from games like Arkham Horror, where you are trying to defeat a great old one, but it takes less thinking to play Elder Signs. As compared to high strategy and traveling through Arkham, you are just in the museum, and different scenarios happen which you need to roll various symbols on the dice. It combines enough strategy with luck though to keep it very interesting and moving. And one of my favorite parts is that fact that you play different unique characters.

6. Lord of the Rings: Board Game

Why: This is Lord of the Rings. You go through the parts of the story that everyone knows which are so great. And you play the characters that everyone knows, Frodo, Sam, Merry, Pippin, and Fatty Bolger. Yes, this is from prior to the movies. This is another game where I can play a unique character. And we have an expansion where someone can play the bad guys, which adds a new level of stress to a game that always makes you feel like you are doing well, and then all of a sudden you are within danger of losing.

Image Source: BoardGameGeek
Image Source: BoardGameGeek

5. Smallworld

Why: Smallworld if a world of slaughter and laughter. An area control game that mixes unique races and abilities, it s a blast to play. I really like the fact that with the different map sizes, the maps are never so large that you can just sit there, people will always be going after another player, and because it is so inherent in the game, And the combinations are great, dwarves who can fly, giants who pillage, or merchant elves, the game plays out differently every time.

4. Betrayal at House on the Hill

Why: It’s another horror based game and it is semi-cooperative. There will almost always be a traitor in the game, and there is always an end game. But who knows who it is going to be, and who knows what horrors the house will reveal. This game is good because, while there is a traitor, no one is actively playing against the group in the first part of the game. This means that you don’t end up with hurt feelings, and it is just a fun game.

pandemic

3. Pandemic

Why: Another cooperative game, you can see what I play most often, where you are part of the CDC fighting against diseases that are spreading around the world. It is one of those games, like Lord of the Rings, where you feel like you are doing well, and then all of a sudden, things start to go poorly, and you don’t know what to do, and are scrambling to keep up. It’s a blast to play and one that I would highly recommend that people buy.

2. Pandemic Legacy

Why: A lot of it can be summed up with – see above. However, it is a Legacy game. For those of you who aren’t familiar with Legacy games, how it sets up is that whatever you do in previous games affects the board and how things will work in future games on the board. It also tells more of a story. So you gain more abilities, and there are other things to escalate and it is always stressful and a ton of fun.

Image Source; Geek Alert
Image Source; Geek Alert

1. Dead of Winter

Why: This game potentially has a hidden traitor, it has high stress situations as you look to feed your colony of survivors, keep the zombies from getting in, and complete an objective. The fact that their may or may not be a traitor means that it is questionable if someone is working against you. It is a subtle game, and a high stress game trying to figure out what is going on with helping the colony and trying to find the traitor.

What are some of your favorite board games, or your person Table Top Picks?

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