Tag: Kickstarter

Back or Brick: Down to Hell

Back or Brick: Down to Hell

According to the Kickstarter page, Down to Hell is a faithful reproduction of hack and slash video games put into board game form. Pros It’s not just standees, so they aren’t trying to make $2 million just on that Skill tree Feels like Diablo the…

Back or Brick: Chronicles of Crimes: Millennium Series

Back or Brick: Chronicles of Crimes: Millennium Series

I almost forgot to do this today, but I want to keep it regular, would you back this game or is it a brick? Pros Based on a good game Can back part of it and decide more later Interesting premise/settings Not just a board…

Frosthaven – Cephalofair Talks Crafting

Frosthaven – Cephalofair Talks Crafting

So we’ve gotten some new information about Frosthaven out on Cephalofair’s website where Isaac Childress wrote a post about crafting in the game, you can find the whole article here.

Now, normally when I do these posts, I’m writing up information from a video so that you don’t have to watch an hour long video or a twelve minute video. In this case, I’m still going to hit some highlights, but reading his post is probably going to be as about as fast.

So let’s talk about this in my normal bullet point fashion.

  • You start with 1-12 items that you can craft
  • Crafting items for loot drops versus gold
  • Buildings can be upgraded with crafting items
  • Alchemist/Apothecary you can make potions
  • But you won’t know what potion, use Pandemic Legacy style dossier
  • Rare loot/crafting supplies
  • Do you use them to upgrade buildings/buy awesome items
  • Character unlocks can unlock new buildings or characters
  • Unlock retirement quests in batches so never takes too long

There’s even more in there as well, but a lot of stuff that we’ve already known. We’re a week away from the launch of the Kickstarter which is crazy to thin and I’m really excited for it and for getting this game in my hands come 2021. So next week keep an eye out for that and my breakdown of the page.

So if you just wanted the highlights, there they are for you, but I’m going to continue talking about this a little bit longer, just nothing new.

What intrigues me about this post is that there is most certainly going to be more of legacy aspect to this game. Now, you’d be able to play scenarios again and go through the main story, but unless it comes base with a reusable sticker pack or as part of the kickstarter addons, you’re going to have a city that is too built up to start another play through of it just like it is. Now, I love legacy games, and if this is another 100 scenarios, it’s going to take me two years to get through, so it’s not a problem, but if you know you’re going to play this 6 hours a week every week, you’re going to get through it way faster.

But, I love that legacy aspect, and I love the idea that you are going to get something brewed and it might be poison or it might heal you, or it might be bog water that does nothing, you don’t know. And as you unlock more you’re probably going to get, minor health, power, and stamina potions or something like that unlocked, do you then push further in to see if you can get better potions faster, earlier in the game? And the fact that resources are used for both upgrading the town and making items gives you another point of decision.

I also like that the unlocked characters (buildings) are being released in batches. We started out in Gloomhaven with a Cragheart who retired after every other character because of the quest that they pulled to start and we just didn’t have the ability to do a quest that they needed completed. In this, it sounds like that problem is being taken care of, which is really nice. Granted, it wasn’t too bad, but to know that we’re not accidentally going to run into a situation like that, that’s cool.

Needless to say, I’m stoked for this game and ready to see what the Kickstarter page is going to look like. What do you think of the new news about Frosthaven, are you down for crafting?

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Back of Brick – Steamwatcher

Back of Brick – Steamwatcher

The world is an icy wasteland, can you lead your clan in surviving the fallout from a new ice age apocalypse in Steamwatchers by Mythic Games. Pro The setting looks amazing Mythic is known company Aesthetic is amazing Hidden action selection Cons Game play didn’t…

Back or Brick: Tumble Town

Back or Brick: Tumble Town

It’s the wild west, and dice slowly are blowing through the streets of your town like tumbleweeds. Can you build up the best dice town possible in this engine building game? Pros Game looks easy to teach Solo play Good price point Light engine builder…

Kickstarter 101: FOMO and Stretch Goals

Kickstarter 101: FOMO and Stretch Goals

The final topic for Kickstarters is going to be this interesting idea of Stretch Goals and how they can cause FOMO or in general how Kickstarter causes FOMO. When it comes to board games, I know that I lot of people have FOMO or what it can also be called “Cult of the New”. If you don’t have the new thing and everything for it, you’re somehow missing out on a true gaming experience. It would take more than one article talking about Kickstarter to talk about FOMO fully, but I want to talk about it through the lens of Kickstarter because it is a big thing.

Image Source: CMON

First off, though, let’s define what a stretch goal is. A stretch goal is a funding goal to get additional content or improvements added to a game. For example, in Marvel United, there are stretch goals to unlock additional characters for the game. Or there are some where it’s less game play focused or additional game play focused and it’ll be something like linen finish for the cards or a Game Trayz insert for the game. So something that is going to make the game feel more special or complete. Another example would be Tainted Grail, they did two expansions that were for added into the Kickstarter pledge but if it goes to retail, you’d have to buy them separately. Basically, they are to add extras into the game, sometimes for the Kickstarter backers only and sometimes for everyone. What is cool about stretch goals is what it can bring the community of board gamers into help something be fully realized. The downside is of course FOMO, that you might be missing out on a bit for the game because it wasn’t unlocked, or because something is exclusive to Kickstarter.

That is one of the toughest things about Kickstarter, the FOMO, not just from stretch goals. If you’re not familiar with the term, FOMO stands for “Fear of Missing Out”. Basically, it’s the idea that you need to do and get everything in order that you don’t miss out on something great. When it’s doing things, it can be a bit paralyzing, because you don’t know which thing is going to be the best or how you’re going to do everything. With buying a Kickstarter, it’s less paralyzing, because it’s money not your time, which isn’t a great thing. There are two ways that Kickstarters can create FOMO for users.

Image Source: Board Game Geek/Awaken Realms

The first is what I mentioned above, Kickstarter exclusive things. Now, going back to Marvel United, a lot of the Marvel characters are going to be Kickstarter exclusive, it isn’t the main characters, but if you wanted Beta-Ray Bill or Spider-Ham, you need to get them through the Kickstarter. So while the game will likely be hitting retail, and I expect it to be pushed big in retail, you’re going to have a more limited number of things that you can get, and to track down those characters later could be spendy. So do you risk missing out on those exclusives? That’s how they get your FOMO going with Kickstarter exclusives.

The other way is technically not a Kickstarter exclusive, but it is pretty similar because it could just be that the game itself is exclusive or not hitting retail for sure. For example, Tainted Grail might not hit retail, and probably the expansions won’t even if the base game does. So do you risk it not hitting retail and having to find it on the secondary market, possibly costing a lot? And some games will only ever be on Kickstarter because they are too large and expensive to stock in stores, or because it is such a small indie project that the person doesn’t have connections to get it into stores. Those I think are easier, but the ones where it might go to retail, how do you handle that? Do you wait and hope that everything makes it to retail or that it isn’t a lesser retail version or do you still go in on the Kickstarter. Add in the fact that deservedly so Kickstarter backers who are making the project happen most of the time get their games first, do you want to wait the extra two months to a year to get the game in retail?

So, is there a good way to avoid FOMO with Kickstarter? I don’t really think that there is. At least nothing that you can do without treating FOMO as a whole. Kickstarter and sales in a brick and mortar store are all built around making you feel like you have to decide now and fast and that you’re going to miss out if you don’t decide fast. I can go into, maybe, in a future article about FOMO and how you can cope with FOMO, but Kickstarter is built to cause FOMO and without just avoiding Kickstarter, I think that FOMO is going to just be a part of it for a lot of people. So, if I were to have a few tips and tricks for helping deal with it with Kickstarter, I can think of a couple.

Image Source: Awaken Realms

A lot of Kickstarters allow you to back for $1. You aren’t going to get a game just backing for $1, but it can give you access to the pledge manager quite often. In the pledge manager you basically can always get the same deals as you did on the Kickstarter. What that does is it allows you to consider it for a small amount of money. Get a regular coffee instead of a fancy coffee and you can do 2-3 $1 pledges. This allows you to feel not as rushed about making the decision. The Kickstarter will run for a month, fairly often, then it might be a month setting up the pledge manager and the pledge manager will stay open for another month. In that month between the Kickstarter campaign and the pledge manager, did you think about the game, if you don’t, you’ve just spent $1.

Similar to this, Kickstarter has a final 48 hour notification. That means that they send out an e-mail and notify you when a campaign is ending. I use this all the time. If I think something looks interesting, I save it, I get notified, and generally, if I haven’t backed it before then, I ignore it, because the FOMO wasn’t that strong. But it could be a good reminder or maybe I got some money for spending on games so I might consider it again at that point.

In both of the cases, it’s about seeing how much you actually think about it. In the games that I’ve been interested in and been all in on, I generally look at it, consider it and sleep on it, but if I’m still thinking about it the next day, I know if I’m going to back it, so I do right away. Otherwise, it’s probably isn’t one that I’d back. These can techniques buy you the time to decide that you might not feel like you have otherwise with a Kickstarter, and hopefully can help your budget and your FOMO.

Do you have FOMO with any games? Has it come back to bite you ever?

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(All games are Kickstarter games in images)

Back or Brick: Stormsunder: Heirs of Ruin

Back or Brick: Stormsunder: Heirs of Ruin

Back for another Back or Brick on this Wednesday. We’re looking at a big Kickstarter, in terms of content that just launched yesterday. It’s going to fund (already has), but is it one for me? Let’s dive into the pros and cons. Pros RPG Like…

Kickstarter 101 – What If It Fails?

Kickstarter 101 – What If It Fails?

I think one of the things that keeps people from jumping into Kickstarters is the chance that it might fail. What if they take your money and the game just never happens or you don’t end up liking what you get because it isn’t what…

Back or Brick: Chiseled: A Deck-Sculpting Game

Back or Brick: Chiseled: A Deck-Sculpting Game

Pros:
– I like action selection
– Cheap price point
– Variability in game play depending on actions available
– Solo Play
– Interesting theme

Cons:
– Aesthetically only okay
– Previously failed
– Limited rules description

Thoughts on the Campaign Page:
They’ve only sent it out to one or two people to preview for what basically is a card game. they should have been able to prototype a few more copies and it into more hands. I understand that they probably don’t want to pay for more previews for the game, but that would help.

I also think that it looks okay, but not great aesthetically. It’s more that it’s not just my style, though.

But the big thing for me is the rules. Yes, it has a solo variant and that’s cool. I feel like their description is a little bit simple, I would love to see examples of more cards than they’ve provided, because I think that the concept of the game and the mechanics combined with theme could be really cool, but while I have a general idea of how to play, I don’t have a full picture of some of the mechanics of the game or how some of the different rotating abilities will work.

Verdict:
I hope that this game funds, and I hope that it makes it to retail. I want to get my hands on this game and see how it plays, because the idea for it is cool. If it was a company that I knew more about, I think that I’d be more interested in backing it.

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Kickstarter 101 – Picking a Campaign

Kickstarter 101 – Picking a Campaign

There are tons of Kickstarter projects out there, some of them look great, some of them are great, and others, they don’t look great but they might be good. I think that one hard part of Kickstarter is that overwhelming amount of content out there…