Tag: urban fantasy

Book’em Nerdo: The Dresden Files

Book’em Nerdo: The Dresden Files

Alright, we already know how this is going to go, I love this series. So it’s going to be me talking about why this series is good, but I’ve finally read everything that out thus far from Jim Butcher for the series. This includes the…

Book’em Nerdo – The Night Tiger

Book’em Nerdo – The Night Tiger

This ties into my reading challenge again where I have to read books based off of specific prompts. The Night Tiger fit a couple of them, published in 2019 and an Author from South America, Central America, or Asia. I was also curious because it…

Urban Fantasy

Urban Fantasy

Urban Fantasy, what is it? And how do you create good urban fantasy?

I’ve mentioned Urban Fantasy before in some articles, but I wanted to delve deeper into it and provide some more examples beyond my normal one.


Urban fantasy is a subgenre of fantasy in which the narrative has an urban setting.[1][2] Works of urban fantasy are set primarily in the real world and contain aspects of fantasy, such as the discovery of earthbound mythological creatures, coexistence or conflict between humans and paranormal beings, and other changes to city life.[3][4] A contemporary setting is not strictly necessary for a work of urban fantasy: works of the genre may also take place in futuristic and historical settings, actual or imagined.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Urban_fantasy

I figure I can just drop in some Wikapedia knowledge to get the conversation going since they are going to define it basically the same way that I’m going to describe it. I would say that urban fantasy basically does always show up in a contemporary setting at least from what I’ve seen. But as they say it isn’t required, but it is extremely normal for it to show up in that contemporary setting.

Image Credit: Amazon

The best way that I would describe it is that it takes a realistic setting, generally earth and our world, and then puts a twist on it. Whether it’s Fae creatures as in Grimm and The Dresden Files, to the weird London Below in Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere, there are large chunks of the normal world still there for the story. These twists on the world can be highly hidden such as in Neverwhere or sometimes very obvious as in The Dresden Files, though magic and monsters are still generally kept under wraps there as well.

What generally makes strong urban fantasy is the balance of normalcy with the absurd. You see the normal world happening around the characters and you often see the characters pining for or rushing headlong into the more magical aspect of the world. While I wouldn’t quality Harry Potter as Urban Fantasy since most of it takes place at Hogwarts, it does have some elements of urban fantasy, and Harry is someone who rushes headlong into the magical world because anything seems better than living in the space beneath the stairs. That compares to Grimm where Detective Nick Burkhardt is not all that excited to find out what else is going on in the world. It makes his job much harder and makes his life much crazier in ways that he doesn’t want. I think this really helps drive the home the humanity of the main character as you see the struggle. There is some Urban Fantasy, and Lost Girl is an example, where the main character, Bo, loses touch with her humanity seemingly as the series goes along. Now, a lot of that is just writing, but it hurts the show when the focus on that has been lost and it was stronger at the start of the show. They made some poor decisions in the show by trying to be edgy, but unfortunately the writing dropped off too much and the acting talent wasn’t up to snuff to pull it off.

Image Source: IMDb

When I think about it, I don’t think that there are many particular things that make urban fantasy strong that doesn’t make most other books, movies, and TV shows strong. It has to focus in on an interesting character with flaws and have an interesting plot to go along with it. Within that a good focus on the tension between the two worlds is generally one of the driving forces. Shows like Grimm and Supernatural, which isn’t pure urban fantasy, but is closely aligned to Urban fantasy, and book series like The Dresden Files, all the main characters are the gate keepers keeping the world of monsters and other scary things back and allowing humanity to live in blissful ignorance of what is actually going on. That tension, whether or not the main character is the gate keeper, is probably the thing that is most unique to urban fantasy as it’s the most consistent theme to it. However, it is certainly not a required part of urban fantasy or something that is only limited to urban fantasy.

So I’ve mentioned some of the examples of Urban Fantasy that I’m familiar with. There are certainly a whole lot more out there, and I’m always interested in finding more to read. So I’m going to ask for some suggestions and then give some suggestions of my own. If you have some that you’ve enjoyed, let me know.

The Dresden Files
My #1 recommendation. The books are very well done and Jim Butcher does a really good job of developing an interesting world with interesting monsters. The series starts off a bit rough as it was some of if not Jim Butcher’s first major writing experience. But besides that, it’s about Harry Dresden, a wizard PI in Chicago who is basically one of the only forces holding back hordes of darkness from not just consuming the city, but at times the world.

Grimm
I believe this show was met with mixed reviews, and I will say that there is some camp factor to the show and special effects. However, I liked the show. It is a bit monster of the week throughout a lot of it, but it does that well. The main character is interesting, and the creatures and building up of the world is quite interesting as well.

Image Source: IMDb

Neverwhere
Probably my first introduction to Urban Fantasy, though I might have read the first Dresden Files book before. Neverwhere is an interesting and crazy crafted world of the London Below. A normal human runs across a girl named Door whose life is in danger. After helping her, Richard Mayhew starts having changes in life, and he starts to disappear from the world. He finds out that he’s now moved from his normal life in London to being part of London Below.

Buffy the Vampire Slayer
One that people might not think about as it’s moved on from being part of the collective view, but like Supernatural, it’s a modern show with monsters. The reason that I would say this is more urban fantasy, at least as how I would qualify it, is that Buffy takes place in a single town of Sunnydale that just happens to be sitting on a hellmouth. It’s a classic show and one that does have a bad season or two in there, but is mostly very strong.

Just to do some more quick hits based off of what other places are calling Urban Fantasy that I’ve enjoyed:
Warehouse 13
Supernatural
Reaper
Stranger Things
The Librarians
All fun TV shows

Big Trouble in Little China
From Dusk Til Dawn
The Last Witch Hunter
The Librarian
Underworld
All solid movie choices, though a lot of them B-movies.

Little Witch Academia
Blood Blockade Battlefront
Ghost Hunt
Those are some anime options.

American Gods
Harry Potter
IT
Daughter of Smoke and Bone
Last two I would say are urban fantasy adjacent books. But I recommend all of these books.

So you can see that I’ve watched a lot, but what are some other recommendations especially in books and anime?

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Not Your Normal Fantasy – Concept Article

Not Your Normal Fantasy – Concept Article

We all know fantasy pretty well, at least I’m assuming that we do. We’ve seen and/or read Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings. We might have read the Shanara Chronicles, Wheel of Time, Mistborn, or so many other epic fantasy series or watched shows…

This Is Halloween: Books

This Is Halloween: Books

We’ve done most of the Halloween topics that I wanted to cover already in October, and we still have two weeks to go. This seems like the right time to do good books for Halloween. The Dresden Files These are also good Christmas, Easter, Thanksgiving,…

Book ‘Em, Nerd-o: Storm Front (Dresden Files #1)

Book ‘Em, Nerd-o: Storm Front (Dresden Files #1)

We’re back in urban fantasy land today with Storm Front, the first installment of The Dresden Files by Jim Butcher. But while this series belongs to the same genre as Little (Grrl) Lost, the tone couldn’t be more different, and the stakes in these stories couldn’t be higher. It’s a little hard to describe these books, but think “1920s noir but with 100% more magic,” and you’ll be pretty close.

In the first book of the series, we meet Harry Dresden, Chicago’s premiere (and only) professional wizard. As the story starts, we find Harry in his downtown office, where business is slow. Before long, in walks (naturally) a beautiful woman with a big problem–her husband is missing, and she wants Harry’s help.

Image Credit: Amazon
Image Credit: Amazon

Harry’s old-fashioned sensibilities — not to mention his need for cash — lead him to eagerly accept the case. At first, it seems that the woman, by the name of Monica Sells, came to Harry mainly because she didn’t trust the police with her case; however, Harry soon learns that Monica is hoping to hide her husband’s strange behavior from the authorities — behavior that, to Harry, sounds suspiciously magical in nature.

By way of several misadventures with paranormal creatures, a slimy Chicago mob boss (what else, I ask you?), and a Warden who dogs Harry’s footsteps in hopes of catching him out for misuse of magic, Harry finds that the strange events he keeps encountering all seem to be leading to a mysterious drug called ThreeEye. The drug allows normal humans to gain the Sight, or the ability to perceive the hidden magical world around them. This is a big problem — even for those well-trained in magic like Harry is, the Sight can cause confusion and even madness; for mundane humans, it can be disastrous.

Harry soon finds that all signs point to ThreeEye, and to whomever is distributing it. Harry knows he’ll need to find the source of the dangerous drug and put a stop to whatever nefarious plot is behind it. But with so many leads, which one is the right one? And will Harry be strong and wily enough to face whatever is lurking in the shadows?

This series is somewhat different from my usual fare, but I’ve enjoyed it quite a bit thus far (I just finished book #2, Fool Moon). I was unsure about Harry Dresden as a character at first, but I’m sold on him at this point. His exterior of suave (and sometimes grating) bravado turns out to conceal a character who is flawed, uncertain, and a little bit reckless. He enjoys using magic because of the cool factor; make no mistake — however, his true desire is to use it to protect both the people he cares about and the innocent bystanders around him from the dangerous world of magic that only he and a minority of others are aware of. In short, Harry may be a wizard, but he’s a very human one. Top that off with a complicated past that is only just beginning to be revealed in book #2, and you have a character who will hook you in and take you along for the ride.

Though I’m really enjoying these books, I do need to add a couple notes of critique. For one, I noticed a couple of moments where things felt a little loose in terms of editing — Harry is suddenly using an object he left somewhere without mentioning when he picked it back up, it’s difficult to tell who’s speaking in a string of rapid-fire dialogue, the logistics of a fight scene are a little tricky to envision, etc. It’s nothing major, but it’s enough for my editor-brain to pick up on. And I have to mention that the whole chivalrous/old-fashioned/knight-in-shining-armor thing Harry has going strikes me as a little casually sexist at times (though I’m starting to think that’s more or less the point, as Harry himself acknowledges this perception of his behavior several times). My final beef with these books is the level of violence — it’s all done to good effect, and is largely necessary to the plot, but at some points it comes preeeetty close to breaching my threshold for that kind of stuff. However, do keep in mind that I’m more squeamish than the average bear, so scenes that bothered me might not be a big deal to others.

All of that said, I’m finding The Dresden Files to be a solid series so far, and I’m really looking forward to finding out where it’ll go next. I’m told that the books only get better as they go along, and for a series that’s already shaping up nicely, that’s encouraging and exciting to hear. I’m hoping things will keep on picking up steam in the third installment, Grave Peril.

Have you read any of the Dresden Files books? What did you enjoy about them? Are there other books like The Dresden Files that you’d recommend to those who enjoy the series? Let us know in the comments!

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Book ’em, Nerd-o: Little (Grrl) Lost

Book ’em, Nerd-o: Little (Grrl) Lost

Little (Grrl) Lost is one of those books that I’ve run into repeatedly for years — like it was following me. Whenever I saw it, it would taunt me from library and bookstore shelves, saying “read me, reeeead meeee!” (anyone else have this happen to them regularly?…

Have You Heard Of: Lost Girl

Have You Heard Of: Lost Girl

Welcome back, fellow nerds! We’re trying something new here at Nerdologists today. Have you ever had that moment where you’re watching a great show or movie or reading a great book and thought, “Holy buckets, this thing is amazing…why is it not more popular?” Well,…