Tag: Cat Cafe

Top 10: Roll and Write Games

Top 10: Roll and Write Games

I couldn’t have done this list a year ago but now I’ve played over 10 of them, and I have even more on my shelf that I need to play. Roll and Write games (or flip and write or flick and write) are a very 

The Collection A to Z – I C You There

The Collection A to Z – I C You There

We’re onto the letter C, and I was surprised with the number of games I had with the letter C. I thought that it might be one of the lower letters, but instead it is one of the higher numbers in terms of how many 

Holiday List – Stuff the Stockings with Board Games

Holiday List – Stuff the Stockings with Board Games

Yesterday I talked about games that would work well for that just slightly too competitive person in your life. You still want to get them board games, but which ones, today I’m looking at smaller games. These are the games that are going to be able to be stuffed into a stocking with less than 68% of it sticking out of the top of the stockings. Now, I don’t know how big your stockings are, but I’m assuming that wi-fi is spotty at best for Big Foot, so I’m going with more of a standard size. Also, right now I’m starting with board games but I’ll be moving onto other holiday lists as well.

Fox in the Forest/Fox in the Forest Duet

Two different versions of a trick taking game. But both are two player only only games. In Fox in the Forest, you are trying to take tricks, but scoring is more challenging than just taking all of the tricks. Certain cards have certain powers on them. In Fox in the Forest Duet you are working together, trying to keep the fox moving along the board and picking up tokens, more tokens you get the better you do, but it’s still trick taking. There are paw prints on the cards, or fox symbols I forget which, and that is how much the fox moves, but which direction depends on who wins the trick. Both of these are clever little games and good for 2020 if you have a limited number of players you can play with.

Zombie Dice

While the previous ones were for casual gamers, I think that this one is one you can pull out with anyone. It’s a simple push your luck game where you are grabbing three dice from a cup, rolling them, keeping brains, seeing if you’ve been shot, and then deciding if you want to draw more dice and roll those. There is a bit more going on than that, but that’s basically it. Once someone hits the point total to win, everyone else get’s one shot to push their luck. It’s like a simpler version of the game Farkle, and it has a theme. I think that the theme and the simplicity of the game is going to draw people in, even though the theme is just goofy fun versus involved in the tactics. It also is really small and needs about no table space, just enough to roll the dice, so it’s good for at a bar, or a picnic.

Onirim

I’ve done two player, any number of player, and now a solo board game. Onirim is one of the best known solo games. It’s all about playing out cards, matching colors and changing symbols so that you can get doors out and escape the nightmares. It’s really an abstract game, but it’s a lot of fun. Plus, the new printing has all the expansions in the base box, which I need to learn all of them. The game is clever in what it does, because there are very powerful key cards, key cards can be played like any other card to find a door, but if you flip a door from the top of the deck and you have a matching key color, you can just spend the key and immediately get that door, or you can use it to look at the top five cards of your deck, discard one, can’t be a door, and order the rest how you want, or finally you can use it to stop some other affect from a nightmare being drawn. And the nightmares have as many things they can force you to do as the keys. It’s a really interesting puzzle to see if you make the right decisions with those really important cards.

Hanabi

Maybe you like the idea of a cooperative game, Hanabi is a very small box cooperative game where you are trying to put on the best firework short. You want to display all five colors of fireworks from 1 to 5, playing down their cards in order. However, you can’t see all the cards, in fact, you can’t see your cards, but you can see everyone else’s cards. On your turn, you can do one of three things. You can spend a clue token to give another player a clue as to what they have in their hand. The clues would be something like “This and this card are blue” or “That’s a two and that’s a two”. You have to give the person all of the information for a given color or number. You can also play down a card to one of the rows of fireworks, but if you get it wrong, the fuse gets shorter. Or you can discard a card to get another clue token to use. The game is somewhat lucky as you try and give specific enough clues to be helpful, but are stuck some on the draw. But the more you play, the more you know how to give good clues that mean something, even if it might not be as obviously straight forward.

Image Source: Board Game Geek

Ganz Schon Clever

There are so many roll and write or flip and write games that I could say. Silver & Gold, Railroad Ink, Patchwork Doodle, Floor Plan, Second Chance, Cross Cross, Cat Cafe, and Cartographers are all ones that would pretty easily fit into a stocking. But I’m picking Ganz Schon Clever because that’s the one that I’ve been playing a lot of recently. It’s an interesting little puzzle of a roll and write, where you have five different areas where you are placing die values. Each of them scores in their own different way, and each of them has their own way you want to place the dice. It’s an interesting challenge and it’s based so much off of combos and how you can fill in a spot in one row to then be able to fill in a spot in another. It’s very satisfying that way.

Now, there are a lot more small games out there that’d work well, obviously I tossed out a bunch of roll and writes. But if none of those work for you, you can also find games like Stipulations, Parade, The Lost Expedition, Not Alone, Love Letter, Hanamikoji, Marrying Mr Darcy, Point Salad, Gloom, Arboretum, and so many more. There are a lot of good small games out there that are a lot more than just just a take that sort of game, or the classics like Uno, Skip-bo, and Pit.

What small game would you like to find in your stocking at the holidays?

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My Top 100 Board Games 2020 Edition – 60 through 51

My Top 100 Board Games 2020 Edition – 60 through 51

We’re back for more of my Top 100 games, this is the fourth part of it, and second year that I’ve been doing a Top 100 list. You can find links to the previous parts below: 100 to 91 90 to 81 80 to 71 

Top 5 Board Games – 2019 Edition

Top 5 Board Games – 2019 Edition

Board games, I love them a lot, so much so that I did a top 100 board games (you can find that here). That was just over a month ago that I wrapped that up, so will things have changed that much? Have I played 

TableTopTakes: Second Chance

TableTopTakes: Second Chance

I’ve been on a roll and write kick lately, and Second Chance is one of them that I picked up because I thought it looked fun in a video that Board Game Geek did. I was right, it was a fun game, though not my favorite roll and write.

In Second Chance, everyone is getting their own unique starting shape which they have to fill in on the center of their grid. After that, two shapes are flipped which players then get to pick one and add it to their grid, touching a previous one. This continues until someone can’t put one of the shapes on their grid. A card is flipped for only them, giving them a second chance. If they can’t use that, they count up how many empty squares they have, and that’s their score. Other players then continue until someone has either filled up their board or until no one can play a shape. At that point in time, everyone counts up the number of empty spots they have, and the person with the fewest remaining open spots wins.

Image Source: Board Game Geek

Second Chance is technically a flip and write, but it falls into the genre. And it falls into a nice spot where people who aren’t board gamers can pick it up quickly. Most people are familiar with the concept of Tetris, and this game has a bit of that feel to it as you try and optimally place shapes. That helps get this game to the table a lot and helps get multiple plays in of the game. The game also plays fast, so that helps keep the non-board gamers attention as well.

As compared to some other games in the roll and write games, Welcome To…, Cartographers, or Cat Cafe, Second Chance is a bit of a simpler game. The strategy of the game basically surrounds deciding if you want to go early with larger shapes in hopes that the smaller ones needed to fill it in will show up later. But that’s a bit more luck based than anything. Now, that’s not much of a knock on the game. It’s 100% a filler game and while there are times that I want to play a bit more strategic roll and write game, the fact that Second Chance can play a larger number of people as well works nicely.

But that is also a knock on the game. I think that it’s very much targeted for the casual gamer, and while that’s great, it isn’t one that gamers who like those heavier decisions are going to love for as long a time as a casual gamer. The tactics are light, the interaction doesn’t exist, and while that’s perfect for that introductory style game, it will feel like you’re doing something similar over and over again the more that you play it. For me, I haven’t found this to be an issue, as I do like a fair number of lighter games, but I can see how it could be. The other thing that helps keep the game from feeling like there isn’t enough going on, is that the game is fast. Once you know how to play, you can play in ten to fifteen minutes. The game definitely doesn’t overstay it’s welcome, even with playing a couple of games in a sitting.

Image Source: Board Game Geek

Overall, this is a roll and write (or flip and write) game that I really do enjoy. I personally like some of the bigger roll and write games better, but Second Chance, because it plays so fast and you can play it with almost anyone, because it’s so simple, has a spot on my shelf. It’s one that I can take to a family gathering, or that I can pull out at board game night and get rolling (flipping) in a few minutes without any questions once the rules are taught. If you are looking for that light weight roll and write game, Second Chance is a great choice.

Overall Grade: B+
Casual Grade: A+
Gamer Grade: C

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Christmas Ideas – Board Games: Stocking Stuffers

Christmas Ideas – Board Games: Stocking Stuffers

Alright, this whole week and probably for a little bit longer, but let’s talk about those things you can get for the nerdy people you have in your life. Or things that you can suggest that people get for you, since you’re the nerdy person 

My Top 100 Board Games: 60 to 51

My Top 100 Board Games: 60 to 51

We’re done with the bottom half of my top 100 after today’s post. That’s awesome, there are some games that I really enjoy on this section of the list, I feel like some of them should be higher, then I see what is coming up, 

TableTopTakes: Criss Cross

TableTopTakes: Criss Cross

It’s roll and write time and there are a ton of roll and write games out there. I decided to take the plunge a few months ago getting Criss Cross, Welcome To.., Second Chance, and Ganz Schon Clever and now I own Cat Cafe as well. So I have enjoyed them, but what did I think of Criss Cross?

Criss Cross is an interesting fast little puzzle game. Every turn two dice are rolled and each player must place the two symbols rolled onto their player board adjacent to one another orthogonally, not diagonally. While you are doing this, you are trying to create rows and columns of the symbols so that they are adjacent to one another so that you can score points. The more symbols you have of the same type next to each other in a row or column, the more points you will score for that row or column. At the end of the game, you tally up your points for each row and column to get your grand total, and whomever has the most points wins.

Now, that seems like you could end up with people doing the same thing if there is an optimal combo to put into play each time the dice are rolled. But there really isn’t that optimal combo, and at the start of the game, since it’s a five by five grid, each player is going to seed a symbol onto the board in the top left corner, and if those are different, that is going to create different scoring opportunities. I’ve played this game with six players before, and you end up with vastly different scoring from everyone, even with some of the seeded symbols being the same.

Image Source: Board Game Geek

There is obviously a large amount of luck in the game as you are dependent on dice rolls, and sometimes that dice are not going to give you what you want. But the game does offer some strategy in where you place things, as you have to consider both the rows and columns for scoring. If you focus too much on the rows for scoring, you are likely going to score lower on the columns, and vice-a-versa, but if you only focus on getting scoring in both directions, someone might score a long string of symbols that might score more points than the blocks of symbols that you are able to create. You also have to be concerned about how you place the symbols onto the board, because the dice must be adjacent to each other when placed. That means, you might have an ideal spot to put two dice, but if it is going to create a pocket of one empty spot, you won’t be able to fill in dice on the final row, since you won’t have two adjacent areas, and that roll might have been good for you.

There is also an advanced version of the game that offers a bit more difficulty and trick to the scoring. First, you have a diagonal that you are going to be scoring as well as rows and columns. Not only are you scoring this diagonal once, you are scoring it twice, once each direction, so if you can build it up, you can score a lot of points. But counteracting that is the negative points you get for a row or column that doesn’t have any scoring. -5 points is a steep price to pay for not having any scoring in the columns, rows, or diagonals, so you aren’t scoring as many long runs, or that is harder to do as a viable strategy.

Either way of playing the game is a lot of fun. I really enjoy this roll and write as a fast game that you can sit down and teach just about anyone. If people are familiar with games, they can probably pick it up, and even if they aren’t a gamer, the game is still pretty straight forward. When you do teach this game, though, the one rule that people tend to forget is that you are scoring adjacent symbols, and the dice you place have to be adjacent as well. I’ve had people forget both the adjacency rules in games that I’ve taught. So I’d remind people of those rules the first few rounds of the game until you’re sure that everyone has it or everyone gives you annoyed looks. Once everyone knows the game, it is going to go very fast in subsequent plays.

If you want to see how this compares to some of the other roll and writes or flip and writes that I mentioned in the first paragraph, you can find that in a Board Game Battle. But I really do enjoy Criss Cross. I think that it’s a good introductory roll and write game, and a good step for people who are familiar with something like Yahtzee to show them how different roll and write games can be. Then I’d introduce them to something like Welcome To…

Overall Grade: A-
Gamer Grade: B
Casual Grade: A-

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TableTopTakes – Cat Cafe

TableTopTakes – Cat Cafe

Another GenCon game, this time a little roll and write about cats. And when you think about it, with how popular roll and write games are are right now with the likes of Welcome To…, That’s So Clever, Dino World, etc., and etc., and etc.,